{Review} Stitching Snow by R.C. Lewis

centralpickswithpunkfarie

FicCentral received a free copy of this book from Disney Hyperion (via Netgalley).
{Review} Stitching Snow by R.C. LewisStitching Snow by R.C. Lewis
Publisher: Disney Hyperion on October 14, 2014
Genre(s): Fantasy (YA), Science Fiction Suspense (YA)
Pages: 338

Our Rating

3 Stars

Princess Snow is missing.

Her home planet is filled with violence and corruption at the hands of King Matthias and his wife as they attempt to punish her captors. The king will stop at nothing to get his beloved daughter back—but that’s assuming she wants to return at all.

Essie has grown used to being cold. Temperatures on the planet Thanda are always sub-zero, and she fills her days with coding and repairs for the seven loyal drones that run the local mines.

When a mysterious young man named Dane crash-lands near her home, Essie agrees to help the pilot repair his ship. But soon she realizes that Dane’s arrival was far from accidental, and she’s pulled into the heart of a war she’s risked everything to avoid. With the galaxy’s future—and her own—in jeopardy, Essie must choose who to trust in a fiery fight for survival.



punk-saysThe fairy tale retelling curse strikes again. I don’t understand why these never turn out well. Maybe because I have such high hopes? Idk. But the book wasn’t bad just a little…off.

Stitching Snow is Snow White told in a sci-fi setting. Sounds familiar right? Well, there are some similarities between this book and Cinder. The tech/mechanic abilities, the space travel, other planets, kingdoms, a hidden princess. But that’s about where the similarities end.

Essie lives in a mining community on the planet of Thanda, far away from the King’s planet of Windsong. Her existence is a quiet one; she makes drones to help with the mining so the men will leave her in peace. She also fights in a cage in her free time to earn extra money. She’s smart and capable, but her personality is a bit harsh. That’s not completely unexpected, being the only female living around a bunch of drunken miners who are separated from their wives for extended periods of time. Her droids are the closest things she has to real friends.

Her peaceful life in interrupted by a space shuttle crashing not too far from her community. She runs to help and discovers only one person on board, Dane. Against her better judgment, she nurses him back to health and helps fix his shuttle.

Dane is not who he claims to be and Essie realizes she should have trusted her instincts when Dane kidnaps her. Because he knows who she really is; the lost princess that the king has been searching for years. He started a war with Dane’s people, blaming them for Snow’s disappearance. Dane wants to trade her for prisoners. Only he doesn’t know the real reason she left and she will do just about anything to not go back.

My initial thought of this book was that it just goes on and on and on. And it’s kind of all over the place. The climax and the resolution all happen very fast near the very end, like around 90% (according to my kindle). Most of the book is just about Essie and Dane’s travels and their day to day life. It dragged a bit.

It is pretty clear that Dane is the love interest but I’m unsure of him that role. I didn’t feel like they clicked, plus he does drug her and kidnap her.

Essie is described as smart, capable, and strong, however it feels like there is always someone smarter, stronger, and more capable. She does some coding and tech work, someone else does a better job. Her past is told in increments, which is alright but it is told in weird parts; “I do that/this because this happened to me.”

I didn’t feel the motivation the King and Queen had for the things they did. There wasn’t really enough explanation behind it.

I just feel so/so about this book. It wasn’t terrible but it also wasn’t as good as I hope it would be. If you really like retellings like I do, you can try this one out, especially if you also enjoy sci-fi!

div

About R.C. Lewis

R.C. Lewis teaches math to teenagers—sometimes in sign language, sometimes not—so whether she’s a science geek or a bookworm depends on when you look. That may explain why her characters don’t like to be pigeonholed. Coincidentally, R.C. enjoys reading about quantum physics and the identity issues of photons.

Author: punkfarie

punkfarie lives in a virtual house of books, where she visits lands filled with knights and princesses and fairies and witches and dragons, and her best friends are vampires and zombies. Find more of her reviews at Punk’s House of Books.

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe for some weekly book love!  

Yay! You're subscribed!